Full speed ahead

By | Science & Technology
Infrared rays of light may be used to achieve broadband speeds of over 40 Gbits/s. Credit@Pixabay

The internet seems to have permeated all aspects of society, containing an abundance of information spanning a huge range of subjects. In modern society, consumers may use the internet for a multitude of tasks, from communication to research and entertainment. The importance of the internet in modern society may be challenging to define due to its ubiquitous nature. These days the internet is available on numerous devices as each computer, smartphone, tablet, television and even watch may have internet connectivity; each aiming to implement this global source of information in a variety of ways. The internet itself seems to be comprised of a multitude of interconnected computer networks which may transfer a range of services and resources using the World Wide Web (WWW). Today, the world seems to rely on broadband for data transfers and accessing information. In the UK the country’s largest internet service providers seem to be BT (32%), Sky Broadband (23%), Virgin Media (19%) and TalkTalk (13%). [1] As the internet continues to integrate into modern lifestyles, scientists expect the number of households with a broadband to increase in tandem.

According to recent research, it seems 91.4% of UK households have access to broadband connections 30 Mbps. Credit@Pixabay

According to recent research, it seems 91.4% of UK households have access to broadband connections 30 Mbps. Credit@Pixabay

The standard for the majority of internet connections seem to be copper connections. However, internet connectivity seems to be moving away from copper connections as internet service provides aim to adopt the fibre connections as it may offer customers higher internet connection speeds. Fibre Optic speeds seem to offer speeds up to 330 Mbps which seems to place this near the top of internet connectivity speeds. According to recent research, it seems 91.4% of UK households have access to broadband connections 30 Mbps. With a lot of updates and improvements made to the speeds of internet, it seems broadband speeds may attain significantly improved speeds. Researchers from the Eindhoven University of Technology have been experimenting with a new method of internet data transfer which aims to achieve increased broadband connectivity speeds. Specifically, infrared rays of light have been used and the researchers claim to have achieved speeds of over 40 Gbits/s. A recent study suggests the average broadband speeds in the UK is around 39.76 Mbits/s. Since there are 1024MB in a single Gigabyte, this new discovery seems to provide a significant upgrade to internet connection speeds when compared to the current standards seen today.

In the UK the country’s largest internet service providers seem to be BT (32%), Sky Broadband (23%), Virgin Media (19%) and TalkTalk (13%). Credit@Pixabay

In the UK the country’s largest internet service providers seem to be BT (32%), Sky Broadband (23%), Virgin Media (19%) and TalkTalk (13%). Credit@Pixabay

The researchers claim the infrared rays used to transfer the data may be safe to humans and this method may also prove to be affordable. Using technology dubbed as light antennas the researchers were able to direct rays of light supplied from an optical fibre. These light antennas aims to radiate light rays in different wavelengths and angles, using an infrared wavelength which may be safe for the eye’s retina. The method in which the infrared light waves are transferred seems to be immune to interference as each light antenna device is assigned a different wavelength. This technology also seems to support several devices at the same time making this new discovery a viable method for household implementation. With this recent discovery by the researchers of the Eindhoven University of Technology may lead to significant improvements in Wi-Fi internet technology. Through using infrared technology the researchers may develop light antennas which seem capable of sending and receiving high capacities of data using complex wavelengths and frequencies. With the researchers suggestions this technique may be relatively inexpensive to set up, may be resistant to signal interference, seems to be safe for use as Wi-Fi medium and is able to transfer data in large capacities. Consumers may see speeds of 40 Gbit/s as commonplace if this Wi-Fi method is adopted by internet service providers.

How might this new method of Wi-Fi technology improve Wi-Fi speeds?

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