Rare mutation shows promising HIV treatment

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HIV typically infects T helper cells such as the one above, via several cell surface receptors. However, gene therapy has created a new batch of white blood cells that show the natural resistance to the virus, in the hope to reduce the viral load in HIV positive patients. Credit image@ NIAID, flickr.com

HIV typically infects T helper cells such as the one above, via several cell surface receptors. However, gene therapy has created a new batch of white blood cells that show the natural resistance to the virus, in the hope to reduce the viral load in HIV positive patients. Credit image@ NIAID, flickr.com